PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SYMPOSIUM FOR TEACHERS

RECORDINGS COMING SOON!

Keynotes

Sunday, March 7th 4:30 - 6:15 ET

Holocaust Education Now: Connecting Students to History

Dr. Stephen D. Smith, USC Shoah Foundation

 

Dr. Stephen D. Smith will present on the evolving role and trajectory of testimony-based teaching methods. Touching on the USC Shoah Foundation’s tools, strategies, and resources across their educational interfaces, including IWitness, this keynote is an opportunity for teachers to explore new ways to bring innovation into the classroom.

 

Dr. Stephen D. Smith is the Finci -Viterbi Executive Director of USC Shoah Foundation, and holds the UNESCO Chair on Genocide Education.  Smith founded the UK Holocaust Centre in Nottinghamshire, England and cofounded the Aegis Trust for the prevention of crimes against humanity and genocide. Smith has served as a producer on a number of film and new media projects, including Dimensions in Testimony, and the VR project The Last Goodbye. In recognition of his work, Smith has become a member of the Order of the British Empire and received the Interfaith Gold Medallion. He also holds two honorary doctorates, and lectures widely on issues relating to the history and collective response to the Holocaust, genocide, and crimes against humanity.

Strategies for Teaching about Antisemitism

Dr. Doris Bergen & Chrissy Matzen, University of Toronto

Dr. Doris Bergen is a Canadian academic and Holocaust historian. She is the Chancellor Rose and Ray Wolfe Professor of Holocaust Studies at the University of Toronto, the only endowed chair in Canada in Holocaust history. Bergen is also a member of the Academic Advisory Committee of the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. She was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 2018. Bergen's research focuses on issues of religion, gender, and ethnicity in the Holocaust and World War II and comparatively in other cases of extreme violence. Her books include Twisted Cross: The German Christian Movement in the Third Reich (1996); War and Genocide: A Concise History of the Holocaust (2003); and others. 

 

Christina Matzen is a PhD Candidate in History at the University of Toronto, where she is also a member of the Centre for Jewish Studies certificate program and a Junior Fellow at the Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies. Christina received a BA in History and minors in European Studies, Jewish Studies, and Women’s and Gender Studies from Ohio University. At OU, she wrote a thesis about the female concentration camp guards who were tried at the postwar Bergen-Belsen trial. Her doctoral dissertation, directed by Dr. Doris L. Bergen, is titled, “Imprisoned Women: Gender, Politics, and Criminology in Nazi, Communist, and Democratic Germanies.” 

Survivor Lounge

Sunday, March 7 4:00 - 4:30 ET

Monday, March 8 3:30 - 4:00 ET

Tuesday, March 9 6:00 - 6:30 ET

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Max Eisen

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Denise Hans

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Edith Gelbard

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Nate Leipciger

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Elly Gotz

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Rose Lipszyc

Breakout Session Options for:

Monday, March 8th 4:00 - 4:45 ET

"Antisemitism: Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow" Film & Lesson Plan

Dr. Tsipy Gur & Ellen Resnek, Classrooms Without Borders

Together, we will explore the lesson plan designed by Classrooms Without Borders for Liberation 75's documentary, "Antisemitism: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow." Educators will delve into this timely topic, exploring ways to promote social justice, and engage their students in civic dialogue in a safe academic space. The lesson is framed around the  Inquiry Design Model, a unique approach to creating instructional materials utilizing disciplinary sources that allow students to explore the compelling question, build content expertise, and develop the disciplinary skills to successfully support and defend their ideas. The session will conclude with a robust exploration into the Taking Informed Action arm, the purpose of which is to guide students to be an active and responsible citizen. By regularly taking informed action in response to rigorous, sustained inquiry, students have opportunities to contribute to—even to co-create—a more engaged, democratic, civil, and generally revitalized public life. 

Dr. Zipora (Tsipy) Gur is the Founder and Executive Director of Classrooms Without Borders (CWB), an independent program of the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh. Dr. Gur has worked in the field of Jewish education for more than 35 years, creating cutting-edge programs in professional development and teacher training, supervising and mentoring teachers, teaching high school students, and developing new programs to stimulate students in the classroom. Dr. Gur holds a Bachelor of Education degree from Haifa University, with a major in Hebrew Language and Literature and Sociology, as well as a Master of Education degree in Secondary Education and a Doctoral degree in Curriculum and Supervision, both from the University of Pittsburgh.

  
Ellen Resnek is the Educational Programs and Outreach Manager at Classrooms without Borders. She has been an educator for over 20 years. Her expertise in educational outreach is only surpassed by her passion for Professional Development. She has participated in and led a multitude of Professional Development programs both in the United States and Abroad. Her classes have designed and participated in cross-cultural immersive activities with educators and students across the globe creating platforms to engage in thoughtful discussions surrounding difficult histories to enrich and inform the greater global community. She has developed and presented educational outreach programs sharing her experience and expertise.

Effective Approaches to Teaching Antisemitism Today

Kim Klett, Echoes & Reflections

Read the news and it is clear: antisemitism is not a relic of the past, but a hatred the world struggles with today. It is important that educators have the resources and tools to feel prepared to talk about contemporary manifestations of antisemitism and hate with students. This learning opportunity explores classroom materials to support effective teaching of contemporary antisemitism, its global reach, and its expression in the form of hate speech, violence, denial, and distortion of the Holocaust. Educators will also explore ways to support students’ commitment and ability to actively respond to and prevent antisemitism and other forms of prejudice in their communities. 

Kim Klett has taught English at Dobson High School in Mesa, AZ, since 1991.  In 2001 she began teaching a semester-long Holocaust Literature course that she created, which is now year-long.  She is a Museum Teacher Fellow with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, a senior facilitator for Echoes & Reflections, the deputy executive director for the Educators' Institute for Human Rights, and is a Teaching Ambassador for The Defiant Requiem program. Kim also sponsors the ADL World of Difference peer training program, the No Place for Hate Coalition, and the Native American Club at Dobson High.  Additionally, Kim teachers a Holocaust course at Scottsdale Community College and is on the board of the Phoenix Holocaust Association.

Frozen Moments - What is revealed in the photographs of Auschwitz?

Paul Salmons

Much of what we think we know about Auschwitz has been shaped by a relatively small number of iconic photographs.

We will explore how to ‘read’ these photographs as evidence, looking beyond the image to examine not only what each one shows but to ask what it reveals. We will consider the perspective of the photographer; the witting and unwitting testimony that the image provides; and how the photographs of Auschwitz taken by perpetrators, victims and the Allies provide radically different perspectives on the same time and place.

For more than 20 years, Paul has shaped how we approach the difficult and emotionally-challenging history of the Holocaust. Among his proudest achievements, he helped create the United Kingdom’s national Holocaust Exhibition at the Imperial War Museum, developing its educational approach, programmes and resources; co-founded UCL’s Centre for Holocaust Education and was responsible for its educational vision and pedagogic approach, authoring innovative teaching and learning resources, and directing its full range of teacher development programmes; and played a leading role in the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance, an inter-governmental body of more than 30 member states, shaping policy and practice. Paul’s recent work involves consulting on numerous international projects, including curator of the international travelling exhibition ‘Auschwitz. Not long ago. Not far away;’ curator of ‘Seeing Auschwitz’, an exhibition produced by Musealia for UNESCO and the United Nations; and consultant to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

 

Paul is working on a number of current projects, including a Virtual Reality exploration of the Warsaw Ghetto with Rowan University, and developing new exhibitions, pedagogies and educational resources for clients in the UK, Europe and North America. His ongoing mission is to develop new and engaging ways for enabling people to interrogate the meaning of difficult pasts, with the enduring goal of creating a more self reflective present.  

Les Expositions Educatives de Yad Vashem: "L’art au Coeur de la Shoah” et "Les enfants dans la tourmente de la Shoah"

Yoni Berrous, Yad Vashem World Holocaust Remembrance Centre
*English version available as first breakout on March 9

L’atelier est destiné aux éducateurs qui enseignent l’Holocauste et nous nous focaliserons sur les thèmes principaux de cet enseignement. Ready2Print est un concept innovant d'expositions muséales de qualité. Ces expositions faciles à imprimer de Yad Vashem sont conçues pour encourager le dialogue sur la Shoah, transmettre ses leçons universelles et prolonger sa pertinence dans la vie quotidienne du XXIe siècle. Les expositions ready2print peuvent être exposées dans les écoles, les synagogues, les églises, les universités, les bibliothèques ou les centres communautaires.

Yoni Berrous est né en France et habite en Israël depuis 1992. Yoni a obtenu en 2012 un MA en Relations Internationales à L’Université Hébraïque de Jérusalem. Il travaille à Yad Vashem depuis 2007. Yoni a dirigé pendant plusieurs années le Bureau Européen du Département des Institution Juives et des Séminaires Internationaux au sein de l’Ecole Internationale pour l’Enseignement de la Shoah. Il dirige aujourd'hui le bureau Canadien au sein de ce même département.

Breakout Session Options for:

Monday, March 8th 5:15 - 6:00 ET

Meeting the Challenges of Holocaust Education in Limited Time (extended 90-minute program, ends at 6:45pm ET)

Paul Salmons

Responding to a range of challenges teachers commonly confront in teaching about the Holocaust, this workshop will explore how to provide an overview of this complex history in limited curriculum time; confront many of the myths and misconceptions students typically bring to this subject, and model the use of a range of case studies designed to engage students, deepen their understanding, and stimulate further learning.

For more than 20 years, Paul has shaped how we approach the difficult and emotionally-challenging history of the Holocaust. Among his proudest achievements, he helped create the United Kingdom’s national Holocaust Exhibition at the Imperial War Museum, developing its educational approach, programmes and resources; co-founded UCL’s Centre for Holocaust Education and was responsible for its educational vision and pedagogic approach, authoring innovative teaching and learning resources, and directing its full range of teacher development programmes; and played a leading role in the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance, an inter-governmental body of more than 30 member states, shaping policy and practice. Paul’s recent work involves consulting on numerous international projects, including curator of the international travelling exhibition ‘Auschwitz. Not long ago. Not far away;’ curator of ‘Seeing Auschwitz’, an exhibition produced by Musealia for UNESCO and the United Nations; and consultant to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

 

Paul is working on a number of current projects, including a Virtual Reality exploration of the Warsaw Ghetto with Rowan University, and developing new exhibitions, pedagogies and educational resources for clients in the UK, Europe and North America. His ongoing mission is to develop new and engaging ways for enabling people to interrogate the meaning of difficult pasts, with the enduring goal of creating a more self reflective present.  

Cycles of Hate: Cross-Curricular Resources to Address and Teach about Antisemitism and Hate

Jodi Derkson, Fighting Antisemitism Together (FAST)

In recent years we’ve seen a recurrence of hate and antisemitism around the world and in Canada. The Holocaust was not the first time in history that Jews were persecuted and murdered. Antisemitism is the ‘canary in the coal-mine’ for all hatred. Today there’s a rise of neo-Nazi and White Supremacist groups. 

How do we broach these difficult topics in our classrooms and learn to respond appropriately to incidents of hate and antisemitism, the oldest hatred in history? This workshop introduces curriculum-based social justice resources free online to teach about historical and current topics such as stereotyping, past and contemporary antisemitism and incidents of hate. Teach your students about the harm caused by prejudice and discrimination, and how bystander apathy can lead to atrocities.

Jodi Derkson, MEd., is a passionate educator/facilitator who wishes to influence positive change.  Jodi is so proud to be the BC Director of Educational Programs for non-profit FAST (since 2012) where she promotes critical thinking, anti-racism, and inclusion through sharing free, online human rights curriculum-based resources, and organizing/moderating educational events and workshops.  Jodi also is the director of www.imperativeeducation.org, which she founded, to provide social emotional learning workshops and coaching to reduce bullying and increase confidence for individuals, schools, and corporate teams.

Who is a Jew?: Judaism 101 for Holocaust Education

Corey Margolese, JTeach.ca

The Holocaust was the systematic, state-sponsored persecution and murder of six million Jews by the Nazi regime and its allies and collaborators. In order to properly understand the horrors of the Holocaust, one must have an understanding of who the primary target of Nazis was, the Jews.

This session provides a brief introduction to the Jewish people. It is a combination of basic Jewish religion, culture and traditions. While it is but a glimpse of a history stretching back thousands of years, it will provide you with some context in regards to the challenging, but incredibly important, subject matter that you are committed to learning and sharing with others. So be a “mensch” (a stand-up person) and come and learn a “bissel”(a bit).


Rabbi Corey Margolese is the founder and Chair of JTeach.ca, a not-for profit that provides antisemitism awareness and Holocaust education. He is also a secondary school teacher with the York Region District School Board and serves as a Faith Accommodation System Contact, an Equity Rep. and as Co-Chair of the Network of Educators Supporting Jewish Learners (NESJL). In his spare time, Rabbi Corey is an on-site Principal for private Jewish school Torah High, a freelance journalist and the in-house rabbi for TheJ.ca, a national online Jewish newspaper.

Teaching with Testimony in IWitness

Lesly Culp, USC Shoah Foundation

Explore USC Shoah Foundation's extensive libraries of Holocaust Survivor testimony and ready-made activities (available in several languages), and discover how to integrate them into your classroom. In these online activities, students use embedded tools to build videos, word clouds, and other testimony-based projects.

Lesly Culp is the Head of Educational Programs at USC Shoah Foundation. Lesly manages testimony-based content and professional development programs. She uses her 22 years of classroom experience to inform the design and development of these resources, to head the William P. Lauder Junior Intern program and to collaborate with international partners. She earned both her B.A. in English, and her M.A. in Education from the University of Southern California and is a National Board-Certified educator.

Breakout Session Options for:

Tuesday, March 9th 4:00 - 4:45 ET

Bring the Voices of Canadian Holocaust Survivors into Your Classroom using Re:Collection

Marc-Olivier Cloutier, Azrieli Foundation

This workshop will open with an exercise to orient teachers towards best practices in Holocaust education and a reflection on why we teach the Holocaust in Canada. Next, the facilitator will introduce the Holocaust Survivor Memoirs Program and provide a brief overview of our free, bilingual resources. Most of the workshop will focus on familiarizing teachers with our digital resource called Re:Collection, which is an educational tool for exploring the history of the Holocaust through first-hand accounts of survivors who immigrated to Canada after the war. In small groups, teachers will test out a short activity using Re:Collection and brainstorm ways they can use it to enhance their current teaching practices.

 

Marc-Olivier Cloutier completed his M.A in Museum studies from Université of Montréal in 2015. He has work at Pointe-à-Callière museum, the Montreal Holocaust Museum and has been working at The Azrieli Foundation since 2015. As the manager of Education Initiatives at the Holocaust Survivor Memoirs Program, Marc-Olivier connects teachers and students across Canada with Holocaust education resources and organizes academic conferences in Canada to support scholarly engagement with survivor testimony.

Yad Vashem Educational Exhibits: "Art in the Holocaust" and "The Children in the Holocaust"

Josh Hacker, Canadian Society for Yad Vashem

*version française disponible le 8 mars

The workshop is designed for educators teaching the Holocaust and will focus on important themes of Holocaust education. Ready2print is an innovative concept in Museum quality exhibitions. Yad Vashem's easy to print exhibitions are designed to promote dialogue about the Holocaust, to impart its universal lessons and to foster connection to its relevance to daily life in the 21st century. Ready2print exhibitions are suitable for display in schools, synagogues, churches, universities, libraries and community centers.

Josh Hacker is an accomplished education and leadership development professional who specializes in developing long-term relationships with educators and community organizations. Josh holds a MA in Jewish Communal Leadership and an MBA from Brandeis University.  With over 15 years of fundraising experience working in non-profit organizations in Toronto, Josh Hacker knows how to work closely with lay leaders and volunteers.  In his current role, Josh is responsible for the CSYV Holocaust education programs including outreach and development to all communities across Canada.
 

Teaching "Salvaged Pages: Young Writers' Diaries of the Holocaust"

Jasmine Wong & Alexandra Zapruder, Facing History and Ourselves

This program teaches how to use "Salvaged Pages," a stirring collection of diaries written by young people during the Holocaust, in the classroom. "Salvaged Pages" reflects a vast and diverse range of experiences—some of the writers were refugees, others were hiding or passing as non-Jews, some were imprisoned in ghettos. The diarists ranged in age from twelve to twenty-two; some survived the Holocaust, but most perished. This program offers a new framework for teaching and thinking about the diaries young people produced in this time of extreme crisis.

Jasmine Wong is a senior program associate (since 2010) for Facing History and Ourselves. She lives in Toronto and works with educators across Canada to provide professional learning, curriculum resources and support. Wong holds an MA in Policy Organization and Leadership Studies from Stanford University, and a B.Ed. from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE). She is also a core team member for Toronto Miracle, a grassroots volunteer-run event that fundraises for food banks in the Greater Toronto Area.

Alexandra Zapruder is the author and editor of "Salvaged Pages: Young Writers' Diaries of the Holocaust," which won the National Jewish Book Award in the Holocaust category in 2002. In 2005, Zapruder wrote and co-produced a documentary film based on her book titled "I'm Still Here: Real Diaries of Teenagers Who Lived During The Holocaust," which debuted on MTV in 2005 and was nominated for two Emmy awards. Zapruder is also the author of "Twenty-Six Seconds: A Personal History of the Zapruder Film" (her grandfather was Abraham Zapruder, who took a twenty-six second home movie of President John F. Kennedy's assassination - now known as the 'Zapruder Film'). 

Inspiring and Empowering Youth Through Holocaust Education

Kenra Mroz, Centre for Holocaust Education and Scholarship

This program will focus on how to use the Holocaust's history and legacy for encouraging students to openly "voice" their thoughts and opinions in the classroom. This program will discuss methods for creating 'safe spaces' for students to explore emotionally challenging topics, such as fighting prejudice. Teaching resources presented in this program include Mroz's collection of monologues titled "In Memory of Those for Whom We Search", and teaching strategies based on Janusz Korczak's findings as an inspirational educator who championed the idea of youth empowerment.

 

Kenra Mroz is an English, Writer’s Craft and Special Education teacher at Sir Robert Borden High School in Ottawa, ON.  She is also S.R.B.’s Equity and Diversity co-representative and the co-ordinator of S.R.B.’s Social Justice Club.  Holocaust History and Legacy have always been integral components of Kenra’s teaching practice.  She firmly believes that Holocaust education is a serious responsibility that requires ongoing personal and professional development. Kenra participated in the Canadian Society for Yad Vashem’s Summer Scholarship program (at the International School for Holocaust Studies at Yad Vashem).  The seminars, workshops and field trips which she attended not only helped to expand and enrich her focus, but also inspired and encouraged her to develop and strengthen her commitment to Holocaust education.  She is pleased to be actively working with the Centre for Holocaust Education and Scholarship (CHES), Ottawa, as a CHES committee member, and she is looking forward to continuing to work with students, colleagues and communities in an effort to promote awareness, empowerment and positive change.

Breakout Session Options for:

Tuesday, March 9th 5:15 - 6:00 ET

Practical Strategies for Addressing Online Hate Speech & Antisemitism

Melissa Mikel, Friends of Simon Wiesenthal Centre for Holocaust Studies

The internet can function as a forum for progress and social change, but also as a vehicle to spread hate and intolerance. This presentation will look at different trends of hate found on social media and gaming platforms and how they impact youth. Issues such as cyberbullying, racism, antisemitism and the real life consequences of these increasingly dangerous and growing trends are investigated along with strategies for addressing this hate.

Melissa Mikel is the Director of Education at Friends of Simon Wiesenthal Center for Holocaust Studies. Her professional training is in education. Melissa has been involved with FSWC in a variety of capacities for the past 12 years, creating and implementing programming with the education team for students from elementary school through to university.  She has also created programming to teach law enforcement personnel and educators about the Holocaust, genocide, antisemitism and racism. Melissa wrote Harper Collins’ Educator’s Guide for the Canada Reads 2019 winner, By Chance Alone, a memoir written by Holocaust survivor Max Eisen. Melissa’s first MA in the field of education was from the University of Toronto; her second MA, in Holocaust and Genocide Studies, was completed through Gratz College where she is currently pursuing her PhD.

Teaching Issues of Today Using Holocaust Literature for Young People

Kathy Kacer, Larry Swartz & Margie Wolfe, Second Story Press

Students today have been witness to pervasive racism, issues of exclusion, hate, and the rhetoric of powerful bullies, and have heard the response of millions around the world who are willing to fight for equality. Holocaust literature created specifically for children and youth illustrates, through compelling writing, the importance of reinforcing why we cannot let prejudice and hate take the upper hand. Stories from the Holocaust teach the importance of inclusion, compassion, and courage in the face of injustice. They also speak to the consequences of hate. Second Story books on the Holocaust for readers from ages 9-18  are being used in  classrooms in nearly fifty countries and taught in over forty languages worldwide. These books and their accompanying teacher’s guides are published to help educators engage young people with this history, and arm them with the knowledge to strengthen and better our world today and tomorrow.

Kathy Kacer is a multi-prizewinning author who has written nearly twenty books for young people focusing on the Holocaust, including her latest “The Brushmaker’s Daughter,”  and her forthcoming title, “Under the Bridge.”  Both are based on true stories of Christians who aimed to save Jews from the Nazis.

Larry Swartz teaches literacy and children’s literature at OISE. His latest book Teaching Tough Topics” focuses on social Justice, diversity and equity issues in the classroom. His recent article “Choosing picture books, novels and nonfiction titles to teach about The Holocaust”  was published in Canadian Children’s Book Book News. 

Margie Wolfe, publisher of Second Story Press, has for forty years been releasing books which highlight women’s lives, social justice, diversity and human rights. She has published some of the world’s most acclaimed Holocaust literature for youth, including Hana’s Suitcase, The Pink Triangle, The Secret of the Village Fool, and the majority of titles by Kathy Kacer.

Antisemitism, Propaganda and the Holocaust: Teaching Resources from the Vancouver Holocaust Education Centre

Ilona Shulman Spaar, Vancouver Holocaust Education Centre

This presentation provides an overview of the online teaching resources produced by the Vancouver Holocaust Education Centre (VHEC), home of Western Canada’s largest collection of Holocaust-related artefacts, testimonies and archival documents. The resources incorporate Holocaust survivor testimonies and artefacts from the VHEC’s collection holdings and are accompanied by lesson plans, student activities and additional readings. Themes addressed include, but are not limited to, racism, antisemitism and propaganda, discrimination and persecution, and immigration to Canada. This presentation will also outline the VHEC’s new online workshop, Antisemitism – You Can Make a Difference, to be launched in March 2021. This workshop provides practical guidelines to students on how they can confront antisemitism in person or online with a special focus on students’ media literacy skill enhancement to detect antisemitic tropes and conspiracy theories. All of the VHEC’s online resources are free-of-charge and can be used in a variety of settings, including home-based learning. 

Ilona Shulman Spaar, PhD, is the Education Director and Curator of the Vancouver Holocaust Education Centre (VHEC). She is in charge of the centre’s school programming, educational resources and professional development events for teachers. Ilona is the curator of the museums’ original exhibitions Treasured Belongings: The Hahn Family & the Search for a Stolen Legacy (2019), In Focus: The Holocaust Through the VHEC Collection (2018) and Faces of Survival: Photographs by Marissa Roth (2018).

Comprendre l’histoire de l’Holocauste à travers les expériences personnelles, des outils pour enseigner en présentiel ou en distanciel

Anne Marguet, Montreal Holocaust Museum

L’«Histoire de l’Holocauste», notre ressource billingue disponible gratuitement en ligne sur le site du Musée de l’Holocauste Montréal, fournit de nombreux outils interactifs (frises chronologiques, cartes) qui permettent d’introduire le thème de l’Holocauste avec vos élèves, pour mieux inscrire les expériences individuelles  des survivant.es dans leur contexte. 

 

Au cours de cette présentation, notre coordonnatrice Éducation vous proposera une activité pédagogique reposant sur ces outils interactifs, que vous pourrez réaliser avec vos élèves en classe ou de manière asynchrone, en vous appuyant sur la leçon et les fiches d’analyse proposées par le Musée. 

Anne Marguet possède une maîtrise en histoire, avec une spécialisation en histoire des migrations au 20è siècle. Professeure d’histoire au secondaire et au cégep, en France et au Québec, elle est coordonnatrice au département Éducation du Musée de l’Holocauste Montréal depuis août 2019.